FAQs

Orders
What forms of payment do you accept?

We accept Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover, and PayPal.

Once my order is verified and process, how long does it take to ship?

Once orders are placed and payment has cleared, your product(s) will ship within 48 hours (with the exception of holidays and weekends). If you have any questions about your order, feel free to contact us by email

Do I need to send my prescription prior to ordering?

Need the answer to this question, please.

Will my order be in an unmarked box?

Your product(s) will be sent in an unmarked box/package. Only the Cannabis-MD return address will be listed. Cannabis MD uses plain boxes to reduce mail theft and maintain your anonymity.

Do you offer automatic re-orders?

Unfortunately, we do not offer automatic re-orders at this time. However, keep checking as that option will be implemented in the future.

What is your return policy?

We want you to be fully satisfied with every item that you purchase from Cannabis MD. If you are not satisfied with an item that you have purchased, you may return the item within 30 days from the order date for a full refund of the purchase price, minus the shipping & handling. The item must be returned, unused or used, in good condition, in original boxes (whenever possible), and with all paperwork and accessories to ensure full credit. If your return is approved, we will initiate a refund to your credit card (or original method of payment). You will receive the credit within a certain amount of days, depending on your card issuer's policies. Please note: Our refund policy does not apply to memberships.

Medical Cannabis
What conditions can marijuana treat?

People with cancer, glaucoma, AIDS or HIV, Crohn’s disease, hepatitis C, and multiple sclerosis have found relief by using marijuana. Marijuana is also used to treat cachexia, anorexia, and wasting syndrome; severe or chronic pain or nausea; seizure disorders (such as epilepsy); arthritis; migraines; and agitation of Alzheimer’s disease. There are many other diseases/disorders that marijuana can also treat.

How many states allow medical marijuana?

Twenty-five states — Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, as well as the District of Columbia — have effective laws protecting qualified patients from arrest and imprisonment for using marijuana under the advice of a physician.

Cannabis
Is marijuana addictive?

According to the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine’s 1999 report, Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base: “Compared to most other drugs … dependence among marijuana users is relatively rare … [A]lthough few marijuana users develop dependence, some do. But they appear to be less likely to do so than users of other drugs (including alcohol and nicotine), and marijuana dependence appears to be less severe than dependence on other drugs.”

Does using marijuana lead to harder drugs?

According to the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine’s 1999 report, Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base: “There is no conclusive evidence that the drug effects of marijuana are causally linked to the subsequent abuse of other illicit drugs … There is no evidence that marijuana serves as a stepping stone on the basis of its particular physiological effect … Instead, the legal status of marijuana makes it a gateway drug.” The World Health Organization noted that any gateway effect associated with marijuana use may actually be due to marijuana prohibition because “exposure to other drugs when purchasing cannabis on the black-market, increases the opportunity to use other illicit drugs.”

Is marijuana more dangerous than tobacco?

In a word: no. Marijuana is not more dangerous than tobacco. Research has shown that marijuana causes far less harm than tobacco. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, tobacco was responsible for 435,000 deaths in 2000, or nearly 1,200 deaths per day. On the other hand, marijuana has never caused a fatal overdose in more than 5,000 years of recorded use. It is important to note that the act of smoking anything is harmful to the lungs, and in this regard, marijuana is not completely benign. According to Understanding Marijuana (2002), by Mitch Earleywine, marijuana smokers sometimes exhibit symptoms similar to those experienced by tobacco smokers — coughing, wheezing, and bronchitis. However, these harms can be minimized by ingesting marijuana orally, with devices known as vaporizers, or by using higher-potency marijuana, which reduces the harms associated with smoking while still delivering marijuana’s medical benefits. Other research shows that daily marijuana use does not lead to increased rates of respiratory illness, and that smoking both tobacco and marijuana is worse than smoking just one. Unlike tobacco, research has never shown that marijuana increases rates of lung cancer or other cancers usually associated with cigarette smoking. In a 10-year, 65,000-patient study conducted at the Kaiser-Permanente HMO and published in 1997, cigarette smokers had much higher rates of cancer of the lung, mouth, and throat than non-smokers, but marijuana smokers who didn’t smoke tobacco had no such increase. And in May 2006, Dr. Donald Tashkin of UCLA presented results of a new study showing that even very heavy marijuana smokers had no increased risk of lung cancer.

Has anyone ever died from marijuana?

In all of recorded medical literature, no one has ever died from a marijuana overdose. In 2001, a detailed examination of the health and psychological effects of marijuana use from the National Drug and Alcohol Centre at the University of New South Wales in Australia noted that marijuana “makes no known contribution to deaths and a minor contribution to morbidity [illness].”

Can marijuana cause fertility problems?

According to the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine’s 1999 report, Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base: “[T]he effect of cannabinoids on the capacity of sperm to fertilize eggs is reversible and is observed at [concentrations] which are higher than those likely to be experienced by marijuana smokers … The well-documented inhibition of reproductive functions by THC is thus not a serious concern for evaluating the short-term medical use of marijuana or specific cannabinoids.”

Can marijuana use cause cancer?

Marijuana smokers do not have an increased risk of premature death or cancer. According to the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine’s 1999 report, Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base: “There is no conclusive evidence that marijuana causes cancer in humans, including cancers usually related to tobacco use. … More definitive evidence that habitual marijuana smoking leads or does not lead to respiratory cancer awaits the results of well-designed case control epidemiological studies.”

Can marijuana cause other life-threatening health problems?

According to the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine’s 1999 report, Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base, “Epidemiological data indicate that in the general population marijuana use is not associated with increased mortality.”

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